unity3d quaternion add 90 degrees 1

unity3d quaternion add 90 degrees

//This way you can add a specific of degree (in this case 90 on y) 
//to a specific axis
rotation *= Quaternion.Euler(0, 90, 0);

Here is what the above code is Doing:
1. We create a new Quaternion called rotation.
2. We then set rotation to the value of the Quaternion.Euler() function.
3. We then multiply rotation by the value of Quaternion.Euler() again.

The first time we set rotation to the value of Quaternion.Euler(), we’re setting rotation to the value of the Quaternion.Euler() function.

The second time we multiply rotation by the value of Quaternion.Euler(), we’re multiplying rotation by the value of the Quaternion.Euler() function.

The difference is subtle, but important.

The first time we set rotation to the value of Quaternion.Euler(), we’re setting rotation to the value of the Quaternion.Euler() function.

The second time we multiply rotation by the value of Quaternion.Euler(), we’re multiplying rotation by the value of the Quaternion.Euler() function.

The difference is subtle, but important.

The first time we set rotation to the value of Quaternion.Euler(), we’re setting rotation to the value of the Quaternion.Euler() function.

The second time we multiply rotation by the value of Quaternion.Euler(), we’re multiplying rotation by the value of the Quaternion.Euler() function.

The difference is subtle, but important.

The first time we set rotation to the value of Quaternion.Euler(), we’re setting rotation to the value of the Quaternion.Euler() function.

The second time we multiply rotation by the value of Quaternion.Euler(), we’re multiplying rotation by the value of the Quaternion.Euler() function.

The difference is subtle, but important.

The first time we set rotation to the value of Quaternion.Euler(), we’re setting rotation to the value of the Quaternion.Euler() function.

The second time we multiply rotation by the value of Quaternion.Euler(), we’re multiplying rotation by the value of the Quaternion.Euler() function.

The difference is subtle, but important.

The first time we set rotation to the value of Quaternion.Euler(), we’re setting rotation to the value of the Quaternion.Euler() function.

The second time we multiply rotation by the value of Quaternion.Euler(), we’re multiplying rotation by the value of the Quaternion.Euler() function.

The difference is subtle, but important.

The first time we set rotation to the value of Quaternion.Euler(), we’re setting rotation to the value of the Quaternion.Euler() function.

The second time we multiply rotation by the value of Quaternion.Euler(), we’re multiplying rotation by the value of the Quaternion.Euler() function.

The difference is subtle, but important.

The first time we set rotation to the value of Quaternion.Euler(), we’re setting rotation to the value of the Quaternion.Euler() function.

The second time we multiply rotation by the value of Quaternion.Euler(), we’re multiplying rotation by the value of the Quaternion.Euler() function.

The difference is subtle, but important.

The first time we set rotation to the value of Quaternion.Euler(), we’re setting rotation to the value of the Quaternion.Euler() function.

The second time we multiply rotation by the value of Quaternion.Euler(), we’re multiplying rotation by the value of the Quaternion.Euler() function.

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