python list and list

a = ['apple', 'banana', 'pear']
b = ['fridge', 'stove', 'banana']

a & b == ['banana'] #True

Here is what the above code is Doing:
1. It creates two lists, a and b.
2. It checks if the intersection of a and b is equal to [‘banana’].
3. It returns True if the intersection is equal to [‘banana’].

The & operator is called the intersection operator. It returns the intersection of two sets. In this case, the intersection of a and b is the set of elements that are in both a and b.

The intersection operator is often used with the set() function. The set() function creates a set from a list.

For example, the following code creates a set from a list:

>>> set([‘apple’, ‘banana’, ‘pear’])
{‘apple’, ‘pear’, ‘banana’}

The set() function removes duplicates from a list. So, the following code:

>>> set([‘apple’, ‘banana’, ‘pear’, ‘apple’])
{‘apple’, ‘pear’, ‘banana’}

returns a set with only one ‘apple’ element.

The following code creates a set from a list and then finds the intersection of the set and another list:

>>> a = set([‘apple’, ‘banana’, ‘pear’])
>>> b = [‘fridge’, ‘stove’, ‘banana’]
>>> a & set(b)
{‘banana’}

The & operator can be used with more than two sets. For example, the following code finds the intersection of three sets:

>>> a = set([‘apple’, ‘banana’, ‘pear’])
>>> b = set([‘fridge’, ‘stove’, ‘banana’])
>>> c = set([‘apple’, ‘banana’, ‘orange’])
>>> a & b & c
{‘banana’}

The & operator can also be used with dictionaries. For example, the following code finds the intersection of two dictionaries:

>>> a = {‘x’:1, ‘y’:2, ‘z’:3}
>>> b = {‘w’:10, ‘x’:11, ‘y’:2}
>>> a.keys() & b.keys()
{‘y’, ‘x’}

The & operator can be used to find the intersection of two sets of strings