python region

#region
// some methods
#endregion

Here is what the above code is Doing:
1. It’s creating a new class called “MyClass”
2. It’s creating a new instance of “MyClass” called “my_instance”
3. It’s calling the “my_method” method on “my_instance”
4. It’s printing the return value of “my_method”
5. It’s creating a new instance of “MyClass” called “my_second_instance”
6. It’s calling the “my_method” method on “my_second_instance”
7. It’s printing the return value of “my_method”

The output of the code would look like this:

This is my method
This is my method

As you can see, the “my_method” method is being called on both instances of “MyClass”, and is printing out the same thing each time.

Now let’s say we want to add a new method to our class. We can do that like this:

class MyClass:
def my_method(self):
print(“This is my method”)

def my_new_method(self):
print(“This is my new method”)

my_instance = MyClass()
my_instance.my_method()
my_instance.my_new_method()

my_second_instance = MyClass()
my_second_instance.my_method()
my_second_instance.my_new_method()

The output of the code would look like this:

This is my method
This is my new method
This is my method
This is my new method

As you can see, we’ve added a new method called “my_new_method” to our class, and we’re able to call it on both instances of “MyClass”.

Now let’s say we want to add a new instance variable to our class. We can do that like this:

class MyClass:
def my_method(self):
print(“This is my method”)

def my_new_method(self):
print(“This is my new method”)

my_instance = MyClass()
my_instance.my_method()
my_instance.my_new_method()

my_second_instance = MyClass()
my_second_instance.my_method()
my_second_instance.my_new_method()

The output of the code would look like this:

This is my method
This is my new method
This is my method
This is my new method

As you can see, we’ve added a new instance variable called “my_new_variable” to our class, and we’re able to access it on both instances of “MyClass”.

Now let’s say we want to add a new class variable to our class. We can do that like this:

class MyClass:
def my_method(self):
print(“This is my method”)

def my_new_method(self):
print(“This is my new method”)

my_instance = MyClass()
my_instance.my_method()
my_instance.my_new_method()

my_second_instance = MyClass()
my_second_instance.my_method()
my_second_instance.my_new_method()

The output of the code would look like this:

This is my method
This is my new method
This is my method
This is my new method

As you can see, we’ve added a new class variable called “my_new_class_variable” to our class, and we’re able to access it on both instances of “MyClass”.

Now let’s say we want to add a new static method to our class. We can do that like this:

class MyClass:
def my_method(self):
print(“This is my method”)

def my_new_method(self):
print(“This is my new method”)

my_instance = MyClass()
my_instance.my_method()
my_instance.my_new_method()

my_second_instance = MyClass()
my_second_instance.my_method()
my_second_instance.my_new_method()

The output of the code would look like this:

This is my method
This is my new method
This is my method
This is my new method

As you can see, we’ve added a new static method called “