.run files in ubuntu 1

.run files in ubuntu

#Assume the file is called some-app.run and is in the folder /home/user/Downloads. You will need to modify these instructions to fit your situation.

#1:
cd /home/user/Downloads

#2:
chmod +x some-app.run

#3:
./some-app.run

#if step 3 fails with a message including 'permission denied', try entering sudo ./some-app.run (you will need to enter your password for this).

Here is what the above code is Doing:
1. Change directory to the folder where the file is located.
2. Make the file executable.
3. Run the file.

If you are using a graphical file manager, you can right-click on the file and select Properties. Then, click on the Permissions tab and check the box that says “Allow executing file as program”.

If you are using the command line, you can enter chmod +x some-app.run to make the file executable.

If you are using the command line, you can enter ./some-app.run to run the file.

If you are using the command line and you get a message including ‘permission denied’, try entering sudo ./some-app.run (you will need to enter your password for this).

If you are using the command line and you get a message including ‘no such file or directory’, make sure you are in the correct folder. You can enter pwd to see the current folder. You can enter ls to see the files in the current folder. You can enter cd /home/user/Downloads to change to the Downloads folder.

If you are using the command line and you get a message including ‘cannot execute binary file’, you may be trying to run a file that is not intended to be run directly. You may need to install a package first.

If you are using the command line and you get a message including ‘cannot execute binary file: Exec format error’, the file is not a Linux executable file. You may need to install a package first.

If you are using the command line and you get a message including ‘bash: ./some-app.run: Permission denied’, you may need to make the file executable. You can enter chmod +x some-app.run to make the file executable.

If you are using the command line and you get a message including ‘bash: ./some-app.run: /bin/bash^M: bad interpreter: No such file or directory’, the file was created on a Windows computer and has Windows-style line endings. You can enter dos2unix some-app.run to fix this.

If you are using the command line and you get a message including ‘bash: ./some-app.run: /bin/bash^M: bad interpreter: No such file or directory’, the file was created on a Windows computer and has Windows-style line endings. You can enter sed -i -e ‘s/\r$//’ some-app.run to fix this.

If you are using the command line and you get a message including ‘bash: ./some-app.run: /bin/bash^M: bad interpreter: No such file or directory’, the file was created on a Windows computer and has Windows-style line endings. You can enter tr -d ‘\r’ < some-app.run > some-app.run.fixed to fix this.

If you are using the command line and you get a message including ‘bash: ./some-app.run: /bin/bash^M: bad interpreter: No such file or directory’, the file was created on a Windows computer and has Windows-style line endings. You can enter awk ‘{ sub(“\r$”, “”); print }’ some-app.run > some-app.run.fixed to fix this.

If you are using the command line and you get a message including ‘bash: ./some-app.run: /bin/bash^M: bad interpreter: No such file or directory’, the file was created on a Windows computer and has Windows-style line endings. You can enter perl -pi -e ‘s/\r$//’ some-app.run to fix this.

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